Full course description

Note: Course content is available for free and continuing education credits are offered for a $6 fee. If desired, you will be asked to pay the fee upon completion of the course material.

Whether working in a health department, community-based organization, or clinical care, understanding the environmental context of our communities, patients, or clients enables us to better serve their needs. This training will provide an introduction to concepts of environmental health tracking and surveillance and demonstrate some available resources and their applications, with a focus on the CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.
This webcast originated in August 2015.

Audience

Entry-level environmental health professionals in local health departments and other settings; clinical care professionals; others in public health or allied health professions, such as nurses, health educators, etc.
Learning Objectives
  • Describe key concepts of environmental health tracking and surveillance (CHES Area of Responsibility 1.2.1)
  • Identify applications of environmental health tracking in practice through examples (1.2.1)
  • Explore resources for environmental health tracking information (1.2.1, 1.2.6, 1.4.3)
Continuing Education Credit

1.5 Nursing Contact Hours

1.5 CHES Category 1 CECH

Certificate of Completion

The Michigan Public Health Training Center at the University of Michigan School of Public Health is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Nursing contact hours for this activity will expire on December 31, 2018.

The Michigan Public Health Training Center is a designated provider (ID# 99038) of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

Sponsors

This activity was provided by the Michigan Public Health Training Center, a part of the Region V Great Lakes Public Health Training Collaborative; the Michigan Environmental Health Association; and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

This project was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP27881 Region V Public Health Training Collaborative (total award amount $825,634) and grant number UB6HP20200. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.